WhatsApp privacy policy: Court rejects Facebook, WhatsApp plea challenging probe By CCI - check all details here

Bharat Upadhyay | Apr 22, 2021, 01:11 PM IST

WhatsApp privacy policy update: In a major development, Delhi High Court has rejected WhatsApp and Facebook's pleas challenging a Competition Commission of India (CCI) order for a probe into the messaging app's new privacy policy.

 

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WhatsApp Privacy Policy

WhatsApp Privacy Policy

According to a report from IANS, a single bench of Justice Navin Chawla said it did not find merit in the petition and refused to quash the CCI probe. The court said the probe cannot be quashed merely because CCI did not await the outcome of the cases pending before the Supreme Court and the High Court. Reuters Photo

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High Court

High Court

On April 13, the court had reserved its verdict on Facebook Inc and its subsidiary WhatsApp challenging the CCI order. The court noted that WhatsApp, Facebook independently challenged the Commission's order without moving an application before the top court and the High Court for clarification. Reuters Photo

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WhatsApp Plea

WhatsApp Plea

Facebook and WhatsApp challenged CCI order calling for a Director General (DG) probe to ascertain the full extent, scope and impact of data sharing through involuntary consent of users. They argued that privacy was a constitutional issue, which could not be examined by the commission. Reuters Photo

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CCI Probe

CCI Probe

The CCI, represented by Additional Solicitor General Aman Lekhi, defended its order by clarifying the issue before the regulator was only with respect to the anti-competitive aspect of the policy. The commission contended there was no clash with the courts on issues of privacy. Pixabay Photo

 

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WhatsApp policy reminders

WhatsApp policy reminders

WhatsApp is reportedly sending reminders regarding the new terms and conditions. A few days ago, some users got pop-up messages just after launch the app. The pop-up message is to remind users of its new terms and privacy policy. Reuters Photo